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Resurrection

Chapter 1: Resurrection

by Jillian

Author’s Notes:

Yes, yes, I know I should probably have put this in the LoTR section, but I didn’t want it to get lost in the vast amount of stories there. Oh, and I own nothing, I just like to play with JRRT’s characters.

Resurrection

‘Kill me!’ her mind begged. ‘Finish me, leave me not like this!

He hesitated just a fraction of a second, then his white handled knife cut her throat, and the green eyes went blank. He knelt terrified and horrified by the dead Orc, for an instant almost beyond his comprehension his mind had been linked to the memories in her dying mind, but what had so shocked the elf was that some of the Orc’s memories had not been what he expected.

But he and his companions had had to flee, for the Balrog had come, and Gandalf had fallen, and Legolas had to put aside his thoughts of the Orc for thoughts of survival. Now, though, here in Lorien he had the leisure to think, probably he had too much time on his hands to think, think of Gandalf whom he sincerely mourned, and of the Orc. He had not known that she was female until one of his arrows had mortally wounded her, but, he reflected, it made no difference, male or female those Orcs had been trying to destroy the Fellowship, and they only acted in defence of their lives.

‘What troubles your thoughts, elf?’ came Gimli’s deep voice. ‘You’re deep in thought not to have heard me!’

Legolas started violently, indeed his mind had been far away not to hear the Dwarf, but he was puzzled. He’d spoken to Aragorn, who had been raised in Rivendell, but even with all the ancient elven lore he had been taught, he’d been unable to help. His only suggestion had been to speak to Galadriel, and Legolas found he had no wish to disturb the Lady of Lorien on this matter.

‘A strange thing happened in Moria,’ he began, deciding that while Gimli could not help, his newfound friend could listen.

‘Ay, many strange things happened in Moria,’ remarked Gimli, sitting down on the ground underneath the tree branch Legolas sat on. The elf leapt lightly from the tree, to land gracefully next to Gimli, and he too sat down on the soft grass, and Gimli busied himself for a moment with his pipe before speaking again, ‘you refer to that Orc, then one you knelt beside, and seemed almost to communicate with before you cut it’s throat.’ Gimli knew straight out asking ‘What in Morgoth’s name happened?’ would be greeted by silence, but he hoped for an answer by not actually posing a question.

‘She, it was a female Orc.’

That caused Gimli to drop his pipe in shock. ‘I thought all those that fought were male’, he said.

‘No, for we went through the centre of their lair, and there were many female Orcs, I sensed them clearly.’ The elf stared up at the sky through the tree branches, the sun had just set and the first stars were visible in the night sky.

Legolas let out a breath he wasn’t even aware he was holding. ‘Do you know the origins of Orcs, Gimli? What stories abound amongst the Dwarves?’

‘Hhm, well, there’s a piece of nonsense I heard first as a young lad. That the Enemy bred Orcs from Elves, but that can’t be true!’

‘The ruined elves,’ said Legolas very very softly.

‘Ay, but that’s just a story to scare naughty children with, isn’t it!’

‘Oh, no, it’s quite true,’ and once again Gimli’s poor pipe hit the ground.

‘You will break your pipe if you keep dropping it,’ said Legolas as he retrieved the pipe for Gimli, who seemed to have frozen in shock.

Now seemed the right time, so Gimli had to ask, ‘What in Morgoth’s name happened? What did that female Orc do to you?’

‘She ‘did’ nothing, but she asked me to kill her, and as she, she, died, she made mind contact with me, and I learned something very surprising. That Orc was once an elf, one of the first elves, and she was born before the Valar had found the elves, long before many elves accepted the invitation to go to Valinor and dwell with the Valar. She was very ancient, Gimli.’

‘And why does that bother you so much! Surely killing this Orc was doing her a favour?’

‘What bothers me, Gimli, is that she shared her memories of her life with me as she died, and I learned something I did not expect.’

‘And what was that!’ growled the Dwarf, straight to the point as usual.

‘She regrets her life as an Orc, of course and all the terrible things she did.’

‘That was not all you learned, I see it in your eyes, lad. Legolas, what frightened you so about her?’ said Gimli, his gruff voice almost gentle for once.

‘She remembered being an elf, Gimli, and she could not take her own life! She was tortured into being what she was, such torture as would have been expected to kill an elf, but Morgoth bound her soul so she couldn’t die!’ Legolas raised his hand to his face, and realised that he was weeping.

‘Take it easy!’ said Gimli, distressed by Legolas’ clear unhappiness. ‘You did the right thing, she can rest now, easy in the knowledge she was forced to be what she was. You only did what anyone else would have done, you are being foolish, Legolas!’

The elf smiled and sighed, ‘Ay I am. At least she can rest in the Halls of Mandos and maybe one day be returned to life, as what she should be, one of the first elves to awaken.’

‘Elves come back to life!’ exclaimed Gimli.

‘Yes, if we chose to, but then we must stay in the land of Valinor, where mortals cannot go.’

‘I see,’ said Gimli, ‘That there is a lot to learn about elves!’ And he smiled.

Legolas smiled back and the two new friends strolled off to talk of customs and to seek the Hobbits, for they were hungry and both knew the Hobbits were always near food, and it was many years before either gave much further thought to the Orc Legolas slew in Moria.


A little more than a hundred and twenty years later, a small white ship tacked into the largest harbour of Tol Eressea. Two figures clambered out, one clearly possessing the grace and elegance of an elf, the other as clearly a Dwarf. They were met by many people, the chief and most significant of those greeting them being Lady Galadriel, tall and golden she stood out in the crowd as did the lovely dark haired elven woman beside her, whom Galadriel did not introduce when she had time alone with the travellers. She simply smiled mysteriously, and said that she would leave Legolas and Gimli alone with the lady, and the lady would introduce herself.

Ever the outspoken Dwarf, Gimli asked immediately that the lady identify herself. She smiled, and spoke for the first time, ‘But you know who I am, even if you know not my name!’

“And how is that, Lady!’ said Gimli, still defensive even though he was getting on in years.

‘Peace, Gimli,’ said Legolas. ‘For the lady wore not this form when last we met!”

Gimli’s eyes nearly fell from his head as he considered what Legolas meant. He found his voice at last, ‘This lady can’t be the one from Moria, can she?’ he asked at last, for once being careful to state his meaning in non insulting terms.

‘Indeed, I am she who was once an Orc, Gimli, and I shall not tell you what my name was in Black Speech, but I shall give you the name I use now, Ellaire I call myself.’ Neither Legolas nor Gimli spoke, Legolas because he knew she had more to say, Gimli from shock.

‘I have one matter of great regret that concerns you, Gimli,’ Ellaire continued, ‘that I was one of the Orcs who murdered Balin and his followers. Yes, I remember my life as an Orc clearly, but it no longer worries except for needing to apologize to people, sometimes, as I am apologizing to you, Gimli, for my treatment of your kinsmen.’

Gimli found he was as unsure of himself as when he first met Galadriel, ‘Thank you for your apology, Lady.’ He bowed deeply ‘I know you didn’t know what you were doing!’ Blushing furiously, the dwarf tried to explain himself better, ‘I meant that you couldn’t help yourself. Blast!’ he swore, suddenly, ‘Why is it that you remind me so of Lady Galadriel?’

Ellaire laughed, not at all upset by Gimli’s frank manners. ‘Galadriel and I are akin; I am sister to her grandfather, Finwe, once High King of the Noldor. So you see, Gimli and Legolas, you are both high in the favour of Ladies of the Noldor, which is not a bad thing!’ and she smiled brightly at them both, ‘Now shall we move on? There are refreshments at home for you both.’

‘Lady’, said Legolas as he offered her his arm, ‘You must be recently released?’

‘Indeed, which is why I currently dwell with Galadriel, I have not had the time or inclination to arrange a separate dwelling for myself yet.’ She continued when Legolas raised his eyebrow in query, ‘I was released in order to greet you and Gimli, yes, both to welcome you, and to reassure, you Legolas that you did no wrong in slaying me, and to give my regrets, to you, Gimli.’ She turned to Legolas, ‘I must thank you, for you cannot comprehend the horror of my life,’ Ellaire continued, now clearly distressed, ‘nor the gratitude I feel for freeing me from that.’

‘Be still, lady,’ said Legolas gently. ‘I am no expert, but you are very recently released, aren’t you, and not too sure of yourself yet in this form.’

She nodded, ‘But Mandos said my regret over my past and my desire to set it to rights were why I have released in time to greet you and Gimli.’

‘Praiseworthy indeed to wish to atone for your deeds, Lady,’ said Gimli, ‘but perhaps you need to do so more slowly, and not all in the first few days?’

The Dwarf’s straightforward common sense made both the elves laugh, ‘Yes, Gimli, you are right, and I see why Galadriel insisted on your entry to this land being permitted. We need more Dwarves here for their honesty.’

‘Humph,’ said Gimli, ‘and the stonework in this road would be better, too!’

‘Can’t you ever see stonework without wishing to ‘improve’ it’, laughed Legolas.

‘As you can’t see a tree without holding a conversation with it,’ retorted the Dwarf.

Ellaire shook her head in amazement, but recognised the affection that existed between the two who walked by her side towards Galadriel’s home. Gimli said little, but it was obvious he was quite overwhelmed by the elven city whose roads they trod. Soon enough, they walked through the gateway of a gracious white house, and into a beautiful garden. Three small figures sat a table, and on seeing Legolas and Gimli, gave shouts of joy, and ran their way.

‘The Hobbits!’ whispered Legolas, kneeling to greet them.

‘Sam, Frodo, Bilbo! How grand to see you!’ shouted Gimli, hugging the Hobbits.

‘There is yet another guest,’ said Ellaire softly, ‘see, he approaches with Galadriel.’

Legolas heard her quiet words, and looked up, sharply, half expecting Gandalf. Instead he saw one clearly of the Valar, and guessed who it would be in the house of a great Lady of the Noldor, and showing an interest in a Dwarf.

‘Aule’, Legolas breathed.

Gimli caught that word, and straightened, looking towards the far end of the garden where stood Galadriel and Aule.

‘Lord Mahal!’ said Gimli, rather shakily bowing very deeply. ‘Gimli, son of Gloin, and I am at your service’, he managed to say.

‘Stand straight, good Gimli, and let me see you’, said Aule, placing his hands carefully on Gimli’s shoulders.

Gimli straightened, and standing tall, looked up at Aule, the Maker of the Seven Fathers of the Dwarves.

‘It is a great honour to met you, Lord,’ said Gimli after a few seconds of silence. Even the Hobbits were awed, and watched quietly.

‘I see I made the Dwarves well,’ remarked Aule. ‘You appear strong and sturdy, but as a craftsman I must know. Is there anything I should have improved in you construction?’

Gimli thought deeply for a moment, giving Aule’s question due consideration, ‘Well, Lord,’ he said finally, ‘sometimes I have wished to be taller!’

And Aule led the laughter that filled the small garden.


End Notes: Ithilwen it was who suggested that Finwe had a brother who became one of the first Orcs, that he also had a sister who was captured is entirely my idea.